1902 Encyclopedia > The Alps > Northern Noric Alps

The Alps
(Part 18)



(B) MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE ALPS

(l) Northern Noric Alps


We have already spoken of the broad mountain zone extending from the Inn to the neighborhood of Vienna, and bearing a general resemblance in orographic and geological character to the group last described. For reasons given hereafter, it seems impossible to preserve the ancient designation Noric Alps for any portion of the central chain of the eastern Alps, but the name Northern Noric Alps seems the most suitable for a region which was altogether included in the Roman province of Noricum, and which closely coincides with the northern half of the Alpine district known to them as Alpes Noricæ. The boundaries of this division are easily determined. To the north and east the mountains subside towards the valley of the Danube. To the west it is bounded by the Inn, which bends first to north-east, then to north, to enter the plain of Bavaria. On the south side the boundary runs from the Inn through a part of the Zillerthal, over the low gerlos Pass, and along the valleys of the Salza and Enns, evidently forming a single line of depression; but where the Enns enters the defile of Gesaüse, a broad and low valley, through which runs the road from Rottenmann to Leoben, seems to form the most natural division between this and the central chain. The line of separation is completed by the valley of the Mur and the depression of the Semmering Pass, over which the railroad is carried to Vienna. The highest peaks of the Dachstein group form the most considerable prominence in the entire range of the Northern Alps; but the average height of the mountains of this division does not exceed that of the Vindelician Alps.





Chief Peaks of the North Noric Alps

Thorhelm………………….. 8,548 Thorstein………………….. 9,677
Hohe Salve………………… 5,993 Dachstein………………….. 9,845
Rettenstein………………… 7,750 Sarstein……………………. 6,558
Scheffauer Kaiser………… 7,611 Grimming…………………. 7,700
Birnhorn………………….. 8,635 Grosser Priel …………….. 8,238
Staufen……………………. 5,950 Waschenegg………………. 8,112
Watzmann………………… 8,988 Buchstein…………………. 7,269
Untersberg (highest point). 6,467 Hochthor…………………. 7,478
Hohe Goll…………………. 8,266 Eisenerzer Reichenstein…. 7,082
Hochkalter………………… 8,595 Kaiserschild………………. 6,817
Uebergossene Alp or Hoch- Oetscher…………………... 6,320
Konig…………………….… 9,643 Brandstein………………… 6,542
Tannengebirge (Raucheck) 7,947 Hochschwab………………. 7,441
Schafberg…………………. 5,837 Raxalp……………………... 6,575
Hollkogl…………………… 5,754 Schneeberg………………… 6,809
Traunstein………………… 5,538


Chief Passes in the North Noric Alps

Gerlos Pass (Jenbach to Mittersill), bridle-path……………….. 4,717
Pass Thurn (Kitzbuhel to Mittersill), carriage road…………… 4,371
Salza Joch (Kelschauto Wald), footpath………………………... 6,533
Waidring pass (St Johann to Lofer), carriage road……………. 2,518
Hochfilzen Pass (St Johann to Saalfelden), bridle-path about. 3,200
Schwarzbachwacht (Reichenball to Ramsau), carriage road…. 2,907
Hirschubel Pass (Berchtesgaden to Saalfelden), carriage road.. 3,896
Diesbach Scharte (Konigssee to Frohnwies), footpath…………. 6,679
Weissbach Scharte (Konigssee to Saalfelden), footpath……….. 7,462
Torrener Joch (Berchtesgaden to Golling), footpath…………... 5,697
Urschlauerscharte (Werfen to Saalfelden), footpath…………… 6,889
Filzen Sattel (Saalfelden to Lend), bridle-path…………………. 3,953
Wagram Sattel (St Johann im Pongau to Radstadt),carriage road 2,933
Pass Gschutt (Abtenau to Gosau), carriage road………………. 3,247
Pyrhn Pass (Windischgarsten to Lietzen), carriage road……… 3,162
Prebichel Pass (eisenerz to Leoben), carriage road……………. 4,014
Eisenerzer Hohe (Eisenerz to Wildalpen), bridle-track……….. 4,760
Kastenriegel Pass (Weichselboden to Wegscheid), bridle-path.. 3,556
Seeberg Pass (Mariazell to Aflenz), carriage road …………….. 4,099
Neideralpl (Mariazell to Murzsteg), carriage road……………. 3,994
Semmering Pass (Bruck-an-der-Mur to Wiener Neustadt), c.rd.3,256





Read the rest of this article:
The Alps - Table of Contents




Search the Encyclopedia:



About this EncyclopediaTop ContributorsAll ContributorsToday in History
Sitemaps
Terms of UsePrivacyContact Us



© 2005-17 1902 Encyclopedia. All Rights Reserved.

This website is the free online Encyclopedia Britannica (9th Edition and 10th Edition) with added expert translations and commentaries