1902 Encyclopedia > The Alps > Styrian Alps

The Alps
(Part 20)



(B) MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE ALPS

(n) Styrian Alps


The boundary between the central range of lofty peaks that extends through Tyrol and the adjacent province of Salzburg, and the much lower masses that spread eastern through Styria to the frontier of Hungary, has been already fixed at the Arlscharte. One the east side that pass the mass whose conspicuous summits are the Markkahrspitz and the Hafnereck is divided into two parallel branches that Hafnereck is divided into two parallel branches that enclose between them the upper Valley of Mur. The northernmost of those ranges is cut through by the broad and deep valley, traversed by the road that leads from Liesing on the Enns to Leoben, which we have regarded as the limit between the Northern Noric Alps and the central mass. The eastern boundary of this division, which we at the same time regard as the proper limit of the Alps, is marked by the river Mur, which, after flowing eastward for about 100 miles to Bruck-an-der-Mur, turns southward, and finally joins the Drave in Hungary. The eastern limit of the Alps is completed by the depression between Spielfied and Marburg, over which is carried the railway from Viennna to Trieste. The southern boundary of the central range is unmistakably marked by the great valley of the Drave. The whole of this region was, along with large portions of the adjoining, included under the term Noric Alps by ancient geographers; but as the retention of that designation can only lead to confusion, we readily adopt the name Styrian Alps, proposed by Karl V. Sonklar, whose writing have done so much to increase our knowledge of the Eastern Alps. It must, however, be remarkable that the region above defined also included a considerable district of Carinthia, along with a small part of the province of Salzburg, which extends to the head of the valley of the Mur. Excepting the comparatively high mass in which that river take its source, the summits of this region do not attain nearly so great a height as those of the other main divisions of the Alps, and only two or three reach the limit of perpetual snow.





Chief Peaks of the Styrian Alps

Markkahrspitz……………. 9,245 Eisenhut…………………… 8,008
Hafnereck…………………. 10,044 Wollaner Nock…………..... 7,019
Faschauner Nock ………… 9,130 Sirbitzkogel……………….. 7,863
Hoch Golling……………… 9,383 Sau Alp……………………. 6,800
Predigtstuhl………………. 8,834 Kor Alp……………………. 7,010
Knallstein…………………. 8,511 Rappenkogel………………. 6,310
Bosenstein………………… 8,018 Obdacher Speikkogel…….. 6,625
Hoch Reichart……………. 7,900 Gleinalpen Speikkogel……. 6,508
Konigstuhl………………… 7,648

Chief Passes in the Styrian Alps

Radstader Tauern (Radstadt to St Michael), carriage road…… 5,703
Katschberg (St Michael to Gmund), carriage road…………….. 5,261
Windsfeld (Flachau to Zederhaus), footpath…………………….7,037
Waldhornthorl (Schladming to Tamsweg), footpath…………… 7,437
Solkerscharte (Grobming to Murau), bridle-path ………………5,767
Rottenmanner tauern (Rottenmann to Judenburg), c.rd about.. 4,900
Turrach Pass (feldkirchen to Tamsweg), carriage road………... 5,825
Fladnitz Pass (Friesach to Stadl), bridle-path……………about..5,000
Perchauer Pass (Friesach to Scheifling), carriage road…………3,274
Obdacher Sattel (Wolfsberg to Judenburg), carriage road……. 3,174
Stubalp Pass (Koflach to Weisskirchen), carriage road………. 5,130
Die Pack (Koflach to Wolfberg), carriage road…………………3,870
Gleinalp Pass (Peggau to Knittelfeld), footpath………… about.. 5,500





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