1902 Encyclopedia > Africa > The Turks

Africa
(Part 22)



(G) AFRICA - ETHNOLOGY (cont.)


(i) The Turks

Ever since the conquest of Egypt by Sultan Selim, and the establishment of Turkish pashalics in Tripoli, Tunis, and Algiers Turks, have settled in the north of Africa; and as they were the rulers of the country, whose numbers were always on the increase on account of the incessant arrivals of Turkish soldiers and officials, the Turkish became, and still is, the language of the different governments. Properly speaking, however, they are not settled, but only encamped in Africa, and hardly deserve a place among the African nations.






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Africa - Table of Contents



Recommended Book

Cultural Atlas of Africa

by Jocelyn Murray

"This is the revised edition of a reference originally published in 1981 by Andromeda Oxford Ltd. (UK). The first section comprises an extended essay on the geography of Africa. The second section consists of essays on languages, religions, early Man in Africa, kingdoms and empires, the African diaspora, the growth of cities, vernacular architecture, African arts, music and dance, and education and literacy. The third section, the bulk of the book, is a country-by- country survey, with an introductory essay for each region. The volume includes 96 maps and 330-plus illustrations (most in color)." -- Booknews

Extra comments:
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