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Psychology

"Psychology" Article - Table of Contents

(A) THE STANDPOINT OF PSYCHOLOGY
Part 1. Introduction to Psychology. Internal and External. Mental and Material.
Part 2. Standpoint of Psychology.

(B) GENERAL ANALYSIS OF MIND. ITS ULTIMATE CONSTITUENTS.
Part 3. Constituent Elements of Psychology. Subject or Ego.
Part 4. Attempts to Extrude the Ego.
Part 5. Feeling.
Part 6. Relation of Feeling to Cognition and Conation.
Part 7. Feeling and Sensation Distinct.
Part 8. Presentation.
Part 9. Sensations Not Psychologically Subjective.
Part 10. Attention.
Part 11. Continuity of Consciousness.
Part 12. Motor Presentations. Subjective Selection.
Part 13. Conation.
Part 14. Dependence of Action on Feeling.
Part 15. Primordial Facts of Mind.

(C) THEORY OF PRESENTATIONS
Part 16. Theory of Presentations - Introduction. Assumption of a Psychological Individual.
Part 17. The Presentation-Continuum.
Part 18. Gradual Differentiation of Presentation-Continuum.
Part 19. Diffusion and Restriction. Incopresentability.
Part 20. Retentiveness.
Part 21. Subconsciousness.
Part 22. Psychological Law of Relativity.

(D) SENSATION AND MOVEMENT
Part 23. Qualitative Differences in Sensations.
Part 24. Qualitative Continuity in Sensations.

(E) PERCEPTION
Part 25. Perception: Mental Synthesis or Integration.
Part 26. Meaning of Perceptions.
Part 27. Assimilation of Impressions.
Part 28. Localization of Impressions.
Part 29. Extensity of Sensation.
Part 30. Local Signs.
Part 31. Movement.
Part 32. Intuition of Things. Actuality or Reality.
Part 33. Impenetrability.
Part 34. Unity and Complexity.
Part 35. Temporal Continuity.
Part 36. Substantiality.

(F) IMAGINATION OR IDEATION
Part 37. Impressions and Ideas.
Part 38. Characteristics of Ideas.
Part 39. Connection of Impressions and Ideas.

(G) MENTAL ASSOCIATION AND THE MEMORY-CONTINUM
Part 40. Association by Familiarity Not Fundamental.
Part 41. Contiguity Inexplicable.
Part 42. Formation of Memory-Continuum.
Part 43. Oblivescence.
Part 44. Repetition. Generic Images. Train of Ideas.
Part 45. Conflict of Presentations.
Part 46. Imagination and Memory.
Part 47. Expectation.
Part 48. Present, Past and Future.
Part 49. Succession.
Part 50. Duration.
Part 51. Is Time Discreet or Continuous?

(H) FEELING
Part 52. Feeling - Introduction.
Part 53. CAUSES OF FEELING.
Part 54. Sensations and Movements.
Part 55. Combinations of Sensations and Movements.
Part 56. Ideation and Intellection.
Part 57. Higher Aesthetic Feelings.
Part 58. Egoistic and Socialistic Feelings.
Part 59. Feeling: Summary and Result.
Part 60. Negative Pleasures.
Part 61. Do Pleasures Differ Qualitatively?

(I) EMOTIONAL AND CONATIVE ACTION
Part 62. EFFECTS OF FEELING.
Part 63. Emotional Expression.
Part 64. Purposive Action.
Part 65. Desire.
Part 66. Relation of Desire to Feeling.

(J) INTELLECTION
Part 67. Intellection - Introduction.
Part 68. Distinction Between Sense and Understanding.
Part 69. Thought and Language.
Part 70. Thought and Ideation.
Part 71. General Character and Growth of Intellection.
Part 72. Thought as Analytic.
Part 73. Logical Bias in Psychology.
Part 74. Forms of Synthesis.
Part 75. Conception of Unity.
Part 76. Law of Dichotomy or Duality.
Part 77. Formal Categories.
Part 78. Difference and Likeness.
Part 79. Identity.
Part 80. Material Identity. Individual Identity.
Part 81. Real Categories.
Part 82. Causality.
Part 83. Objectivity of Thought.

(K) PRESENTATION OF SELF, SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS, AND CONDUCT
Part 84. Presentation of Self, Self-Consciousness, and Conduct - Introduction.
Part 85. Self and the Body.
Part 86. Inner Self.
Part 87. Self as a Person.
Part 88. Self Consciousness.
Part 89. Conduct.

(L) FURTHER READING ON PSYCHOLOGY
Part 90. Further Reading on Psychology.



The above article was written by: James Ward, M.A., LL.D., D/Sc.; Fellow of Trin. Coll., and Professor of Mental Philosophy, Cambridge; Gifford Lecturer, University of Aberdeen,1895-97; author of Naturalism and Agnosticism.




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